Advanced Conversational Latin: János Zermegh’s Historia rerum gestarum inter Ferdinandum et Ioannem Ungariae reges

Advanced Conversational Latin: János Zermegh’s Historia rerum gestarum inter Ferdinandum et Ioannem Ungariae reges

Course Description: In 1526, Suleiman the Great’s Ottoman army defeated Louis II, king of Hungary and Bohemia near the town of Mohács in Southern Hungary. Louis lost his life in the battle, and soon two new kings of Hungary were elected and crowned almost simultaneously. One of these was John Szapolyai, a Hungarian nobleman serving at the time as voivode (governor) of Transylvania, and the other was Ferdinand from the House of Habsburg, who was elected as king of Bohemia as well. Civil war ensued, and the country was eventually divided into two parts. One of the main accounts about these turbulent years between 1526 and 1540 is a relatively short Latin work by János Zermegh (ca. 1504/1510?–1584). This was probably written in the second half of the 16th century as source material for Stephen Báthory’s court historian, the Venetian humanist Giovanni Michele Bruto, but it was eventually printed from what might have been the only manuscript in 1662 in Amsterdam. In this course, students will read and discuss selected passages from this interesting but comparatively easy-to-read Neo-Latin text in the original language.

DETAILS

Level: This course is intended for those with experience speaking Latin.

Textbook:Instructor will provide materials.

Sections capped at: 5 students. If the course is sold-out, please fill out this waiting-list form.

When
Fridays, 2:00p.m. EST

Cost
$250

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Instructor

Zoltán Tomkó

Zoltán studied classical and Renaissance studies for two years at the Academy Vivarium Novum, a unique institute where students are allowed to speak only Latin and Ancient Greek. After graduating in Classics in Rome, he studied sinology and history in Vienna, specializing in ancient and early modern history with a special focus on historiography. He has been teaching conversational Latin and Greek for several years.