Telepaideia Courses Spring III 2020

Telepaideia classes are taught online in small groups. Our third spring term, Maymester 2020, runs for five weeks: from the week of May 3rd through June 6th. Each class meeting lasts one hour. To enroll, please fill out the form linked at the bottom of the page and pay by credit card. Information about Google Meet technology and instructions on how to join the classes will be emailed in the week before the start of the class.

Continuing Education Units (CEU's) are available for Telepaideia courses. Students interested in taking the course for CEU credit should indicate this on their enrollment form and will be asked to submit a short (1/2-page) written reflection at the end of the course.

 

 

Reading Courses

Texts in these classes are read in Latin or Greek and discussed in English. 

 

Greek and Latin: Ancient Pandemics - FULL

Course Description: Plagues and epidemics have appeared in literary works since the time of Homer. In fact, the Iliad starts with a plague sent by Apollo, which sows discord in the Achaean camp. Starting with the Homeric episode, this course will go on to examine other Greek and Roman literary depictions of plague outbreaks and their socio-political effects, focusing on Sophocles, Thucydides, Lucretius, Celsus, Galen, and Procopius. How do ancient poets, historians, and physicians deal with the deadly outbreak of a mysterious disease? Are there common thematic threads in Greek and Roman plague narratives? These and related questions will also be an opportunity to address the history of diseases and medical practices in the ancient world more generally. NB: Texts can be read in the original language or in English translation. During class time, we shall comment on the text in English and discuss any subject of interest to the group. This course will also introduce students to the use of digital tools for the semantic analysis of ancient texts.
Level: This course is open to students at all levels. No prior knowledge of Latin or Ancient Greek is required.
Textbook: Instructor will provide materials.
Schedule: Wednesdays at 12:00 pm EDT
Tuition: $100 (five meetings total)
Instructor: Marco Romani Mistretta
Sections capped at: 5 students. This course is now full.

 

Latin: Vergil - "Raising Acheron: Books 7-12 of The Aeneid"

“And if the heavens cannot be moved, I will raise hell instead!” With this vow of vengeance, Juno sets the tone for the dire world presented in the second half of the Aeneid. Rage, despair, and insatiable violence will characterize the Trojan ‘homecoming’ into Italy. The prophecies of the coming Roman age are fulfilled, but should the founding of the city be seen as a blessing or a curse for the world it is destined to rule? In this course, we will translate selected short passages across books 7-12, as well as read these books in their entirety in English. One day each week will be devoted to translation, and the other day to interpretive discussions. 

Level: This course is intended for students with intermediate to advanced knowledge of Latin
Textbook: Instructor will provide materials.
Schedule: Tuesdays and Fridays 3pm EDT 
Instructor: George Saad
Tuition: $200 (ten meetings total)
Sections capped at: 5 students. 

 

Latin: Late Antique Poetry - Full

In this course we will survey 5 Latin poets of Late Antiquity, focusing on one per session: Ausonius, Prudentius, Claudian, Rutilius, and Sidonius. In session we'll focus on particular sections of a work by each author in Latin, reading at sight, but the entirety of the work will be presented in English beforehand, to be read in anticipation of each session. This way we will approach each session with an idea of a work's content, but will focus with fresh eyes on the Latin and have an immediate experience with it. The goal is to sample the poetic style of each author and consider their place in the wider world of the eventful 4th and 5th centuries.
Level: This course is intended for students with intermediate to advanced knowledge of Latin
Textbook: Instructor will provide materials.
Schedule: Tuesdays at 6:00pm EDT 
InstructorDavid Hewett
Tuition: $200 (five meetings total--two hours each)
Sections capped at: 5 students. This course is now full.

 

Latin: Stress-free Roman History, Part I - Full

Course Description: In this stress-free course, we will translate and discuss books 1–5 of Eutropius’ Breviarium Historiae Romanae, often considered the easiest ancient Latin text; this will allow students to boost their competence and confidence in translation, as well as provide a survey of the first half of Roman history. Students are encouraged (but not required) to read the text at sight, with no prior preparation.
Level: This course is intended for students with intermediate knowledge of Latin.
Schedule: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 7 PM EDT
Textbook: The text of Eutropius’ Breviarium is available online at The Latin Library.
Instructor: Tyler Patterson
Tuition: $200 (ten meetings total)
Sections capped at: 5 students

 

Latin: Vergil, Aeneid VIII - FULL

Course Description: In this class, we will translate and discuss the eighth book of Virgil’s Aeneid, in which Aeneas arrives at last to the future site of Rome; notable episodes include the battle of Hercules and Cacus, as well as the Shield of Aeneas, depicting the Battle of Actium and Augustus’ triple triumph.
Level: This course is intended for students with advanced knowledge of Latin.
Schedule: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 6 PM EDT
Textbook: Any edition of the text is acceptable, but O’Hara’s 2018 commentary is recommended.
Instructor: Tyler Patterson
Tuition: $200 (ten meetings total)
Sections capped at: 5 students. This course is now full.

 

Latin: Cornelius Nepos' Life of Hannibal

Course Description: This course is designed to explore the Life if Hannibal as written by Cornelius Nepos. This is a “traditional” reading course and we will translate the text as a whole.
Level: This course is intended for students with advanced knowledge of Latin.
Schedule: Mondays and Thursdays, 1:00 PM EDT
Textbook: The text is available freely online.
Instructor: Andrew Morehouse
Tuition: $200 (ten meetings total)
Sections capped at: 5 students

 

Latin: Sight Reading: Magical Medieval Latin - two sections

Course Description: Each week students will practice sight reading a Medieval Latin text from a different author. Focus will be on stories about magical, fantastical or supernatural beings to help get our minds off what's going on in the world today. Section 2 is the same course that was offered in April, Section 1 has new material. 
Level: This course is intended for students who already have a thorough understanding of Latin grammar but assumes no experience with this era/genre of Latin.
Textbook: Instructor will provide materials.
Schedule: Section 1: Tuesdays at 7:00pm EDT, Section 2: Thursdays at 7:00pm EDT
Tuition: $100 (five meetings total)
Instructor: Michael Sweet
Sections capped at: 5 students. 

 

Latin: Selections from Petronius’ Satyrica 

Course Description: One of the most unusual works of Latin literature to survive from antiquity, the Satyrica takes place not among mythical gods and heroes or the palaces of the wealthy and powerful, but in streets, dives, and the homes of the vulgar aspiring nouveau riche. The Latin is far more informal and colloquial than in other commonly read Latin authors, and the work gives us a peek at how those not in the elite classes lived. The largest surviving fragment, the Cena Trimalchionis, is one of the most famous, and fun, set-pieces in Latin literature.
Level: This course is intended for students with intermediate to advanced reading knowledge of Latin.
Textbook: Gilbert Lawall’s or Beth Severy-Hoven’s collection of selections from the Satyrica with commentary.
Schedule: Tuesdays and Thursdays at 7:00 p.m. EDT
Instructor: David J. White
Tuition: $200 (ten meetings total)
Sections capped at: 5 students

 

Latin: Catullus - Polymetrics and Elegiacs

Course Description: Catullus is not only one of the most popular surviving Roman poets, but his work displays the mastery of an astonishing range of styles, genres, and meters. In this course we will read selections from his shorter poems, the Polymetrics (poems 1-60) and the Elegiacs (poems 69-116), in which Catullus discusses aspects of his private life as well as his friends and acquaintances among the prominent and not-so-prominent figures of the day.
Level: This course is intended for students with intermediate to advanced reading knowledge of Latin.
Textbook: Daniel Garrison’s A Student’s Catullus or Robinson Ellis’ Commentary to Catullus (the latter available for free as a PDF).
Schedule: Tuesdays and Thursdays at 6:00 p.m. EDT
Instructor: David J. White
Tuition: $200 (ten meetings total)
Sections capped at: 5 students

 

Latin: Fux’s Gradus ad Parnassum

Course Description: In this course, participants will read Johannes Fux’s charming didactic dialog on contrapuntal composition. Originally published in 1725 in the internationally accessible language of Latin, Fux’s Gradus has shaped Western music theory and composition for generations. It is a foundational text for any musician interested in studying harmony and counterpoint. 
Level: This course is ideal for lovers of Neo-Latin, musicians, and lovers of music with at least 2 years (4 semesters) of Latin and a solid grasp of grammatical constructions and vocabulary. Ability to read staff notation will also come in handy! 
Textbook: Text will be provided by the instructor.
Schedule: Mondays at 6:00pm EDT
Instructor: R.J. Parsons-McCrackin
Tuition: $100 (five meetings total)
Sections capped at: 5 students

 

Greek: Plato's Republic, Book 1 - FULL

Course DescriptionThis class is an exercise in "slow reading": its aim is not to go as far as possible but to get as much as possible out of every line as regards both the nuances of grammar/syntax and the logic of the argument. NB: It is a continuation of previous reading classes on the same text. We'll resume at ... [loc. TBA, depending on where the current class ends]; new students are expected to have read thus far at least in a translation. Sight reading is not required, home preparation is essential.

Level: This course is intended for students with intermediate to advanced knowledge of Ancient Greek.
Textbook: Instructor will provide materials.
Schedule: Mondays at 8:00pm EDT
InstructorArkadi Choufrine
Tuition: $100 (five meetings total)
Sections capped at: 5 students. This course is now full.

 

Greek: Nicomachean Ethics, Book 2  

Course Description: This class is an exercise in "slow reading": its aim is not to go as far as possible but to get as much as possible out of every line as regards both the nuances of grammar/syntax and the logic of the argument. NB: It is a continuation of the previous reading class on the same text. We'll resume at ... [loc. TBA, depending on where the current class ends]; new students are expected to have read thus far at least in a translation. Sight reading is not required, home preparation is essential.

Level: This course is intended for students with intermediate to advanced knowledge of Ancient Greek.
Textbook: Instructor will provide materials.
Schedule: Thursdays at 8:00pm EDT
InstructorArkadi Choufrine
Tuition: $100 (five meetings total)
Sections capped at: 5 students. 

 

GREEK: LUCIAN'S "TRUE STORIES" The Adventure Continues

Course Description: Fish that get you drunk, Moonmen, giant space-vulture cavalry, warring peoples inside the belly of a whale, emerald cities, Odyssean tall tales, Herodotean ethnographies, Thucydidean battle scenes, interplanetary imperialism, owl generals, garlic fighters, and smoke-eaters -- Lucian's True Stories is one of the wackiest and most enjoyable authentic Ancient Greek texts. Western literature's oldest science fiction novel, True Stories has delighted and influenced countless later authors: Thomas More, Rabelais, Voltaire, Niels Klim, Jules Verne, Douglas Adams, and many others. We will read as much of this swashbuckler as we can, briefly discussing and reviewing grammar topics and idioms as they come up but mainly trying to read as much Greek as possible and identify the many allusions to, and satire of, canonical Greek classics (the book is stuffed with inside jokes for classicists). NB: This class is a continuation of last term's "True Stories" class but it is in no way necessary to have taken that class for this one to make sense and be fun.
Level:  This course is intended for students with intermediate to advanced knowledge of Ancient Greek.
Textbook:  Either the Nimis and Hayes edition or the C.T. Hadavas edition.  The former is available as a free pdf.
Schedule:  Tuesdays and Thursdays at 7:00 P.M. EDT
InstructorDavid Ring
Tuition: $200 (ten meetings total)
Sections capped at: 5 students.

 

CONVERSATIONAL LATIN AND GREEK

 

Beginning Conversational Latin - Both sections are now full

Course Description: The aim of this course is to help participants gain confidence and skill in expressing one’s self in Latin as well as understanding the words of others in extemporaneous Latin conversations. It is recommended that participants have completed all rudimentary grammar coursework and have read one or more Latin authors. A variety of texts will be provided by the instructor, but they will only be tools to provide spoken Latin practice opportunities.
Level: This course is intended for beginning Latin speakers with a solid grammatical foundation.
Textbook: Instructor will provide materials. 
Schedule: Section 1: Fridays at 6:00pm EDT, Section 2: Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:00pm EDT
InstructorR.J. Parsons-McCrackin (Section 1), Daniel Gallagher (Section 2)
Tuition: $100 (Section 1, five meetings total), $200 (Section 2, ten meetings total)
Sections capped at: 5 students. Section 1 is now full.

 

Intermediate Conversational Latin

Course Description: This Latin conversation class is designed to allow participants to practice speaking Latin as an active language. This will be done by means of guided conversation, reading selections, and interactive activities. It is expected that participants have at least an intermediate-level mastery of Latin speaking.
Level: This course is intended for intermediate Latin speakers.
Textbook: Instructor will provide materials. 
Schedule: Monday and Friday at 5:00pm EDT 
Instructor: Andrew Morehouse Tuition: $200 (ten meetings total)
Sections capped at: 5 students. 

 

Intermediate Conversational Latin: Virgil’s Eclogues - FULL

Course Description: Ten classes, each dedicated to one of Virgil's pastoral poems: haunting and enigmatic verses that have inspired a whole tradition of pastoral poetry. We’ll approach them using “active” Latin so that intermediate students can start to understand, talk about them, and exercise their Latin skills with them without any need of an intervening translation.
Textbook: Instructor will provide materials. 
Schedule: Tuesdays and Thursdays at 10:15am EDT
InstructorDaniel Gallagher
Section capped at: 5 students. This course is now full.

 

Intermediate Conversational Latin: Seneca’s The Trojan Women

Course Description: A classic Roman tragedy about the women who survive the fall of Troy. Before their Greek conquerors haul them off, an oracle demands the sacrifice of two of their offspring. Faced with such senseless slaughter, who would not prefer death? Discussing grammar, meter, and drama, this “living Latin” course for intermediates will culminate in a virtual performance of the play.
Level: This course is intended for students with intermediate to advanced reading knowledge of Latin.
Textbook: Instructor will provide materials. 
Schedule: Tuesdays and Thursdays at 9:00am EDT
Instructor: Daniel Gallagher
Section capped at: 5 students

 

INTERMEDIATE CONVERSATIONAL LATIN: Cicero's Somnium Scipionis

Course Description: Though a work of Cicero might sound too difficult for an intermediate conversational Latin class, it is hoped that participants will see how one can have a comprehensible, intermediate Latin conversation about an advanced, authentic text. In odd-numbered text sessions we will break up the more intimidating periodic sentences into bite-sized chunks, paraphrase them, and discuss the passage (approximately three pages long) as literature and philosophy. In each even-numbered session we will converse in Latin about our lives, passions, hobbies, opinions, etc., using questions containing key words and idioms from the previous session's assigned passage. To aid with the enodatio, the instructor will provide "sentence maps" that help separate the main and subordinate clauses. By the end of the course, participants will have discussed and paraphrased an advanced Latin text in Latin and absorbed many Ciceronian idioms perfect for everyday conversation. We will truly "mine" this text for spoken Latin guidance, as well as engage in close reading of the text. Home preparation is essential for this class.
Level: This course is intended for those who could handle Cicero in a grammar-translation class context but whose spoken Latin experience is perhaps only intermediate.
Textbook: The best edition for our purposes is the penultimate chapter of Orberg's Roma Aeterna. John A. Stevens' Bryn Mawr Commentary may also be useful. In any case the instructor can provide texts, if need be, including pdf of monolingual Renaissance edition with Latin notes. Instructor can also provide audio recording to those interested.
Schedule: Mondays and Wednesdays at 2:00pm EDT (Section 1) and Mondays and Wednesdays at 7:00pm EDT (Section 2).
Instructor: David Ring
Tuition: $200 (ten meetings total)
Sections capped at: 5 students.

 

Intermediate-Advanced Conversational Latin: Vulgate: The Book of Ruth

Course Description: "[these] brief chapters outline the two principal archetypes of Western narrative, the Abrahamic myth of definitive rupture and the Odysseian myth of ultimate return, the journey home." (Herbert Marks) Among the "greatest hits" of the Bible, The Book of Ruth is sui generis. In it we find a peaceful, harmonious world of neighborly "small town" values, where landowner and field worker respect each other, where strong women of character take center stage, where the valor of the heroines and heroes requires no swords, where there are no villains, and where inclusivity triumphs over ancestral animosities. This charming and beloved text investigates the nature of love, family, friendship, loyalty, trust, community, redemption, and inclusion. It raises provocative questions: What is home? How can one "go back (home)" to a place one has never been? Is this book a subversive dissent regarding the status of the Moabites? Does it turn the martial ideal of a "mighty (man) of worth" on its head? But why is the last word of the text "David"? This enchanting literary masterpiece raises these and many other questions in fewer than 100 lines/4 chapters. In this class participants will read closely and discuss the Vulgate and Castellio translations, as well as read for context (in whatever language) several crucial passages from the Torah, Ezra and Nehemiah, the beginning of 1 Samuel, etc. The instructor will provide minimal notes on names, translation issues, etc., as well as several reading and discussion questions for each assigned reading. Despite very short weekly readings, thoughtful preparation will be essential in order to have rich and efficient seminar discussions. Participants must agree to adhere to the instructor's ground rules concerning the nature of a Great Books seminar, in particular with regard to the use of secondary sources. For example, in one later session the homework will be to re-read the book carefully and write a proposed outline of the artistic structure of the whole. The intent of that assignment is that participants grapple with the text and think for themselves rather than look at any pre-existing compositional outline from secondary literature.

Level: This course is intended for students with advanced knowledge of Latin and at least intermediate proficiency in speaking Latin.
Textbook: Instructor will provide materials (and audio recordings, if requested).
Schedule: Fridays at 1:00pm EDT
Instructor: David Ring
Tuition: $100 (five meetings total)
Sections capped at: 5 students.

 

Advanced Conversational Latin: Colloquia Philosophica - FULL

Course Description: In this course, besides normal discourse, we will discuss and debate various theoretical controversiae with an eye toward ancient philosophy. Occasionally, we will read texts before the class to prepare for discussion. All discussants should be prepared to share their perspectives with other participants to engage in lively and civil discussion. We will consider how we can use these perspectives to better our own lives.
Level: This course is intended for advanced Latin speakers.
Textbook: Instructor will provide materials. 
Schedule: Monday and Friday at 6:30pm EDT
Instructor: Andrew Morehouse 
Sections capped at: 5 students. This course is now full.

 

Extensive Latin Reading: Hyginus' Fabulae (Conducted in Latin)

Course Description: This course is designed to explore a little read but thoroughly enjoyable Latin author: Gaius Iulius Hyginus. Here we will read Hyginus’ Fabulae, brevia about mythological characters and narratives from the ancient world. We will sightread the texts. This is class is designed to be conducted entirely in Latin. The participant should feel comfortable with discussing basic aspects of their daily lives as well as being guided through a text in Latin.
Level: This course is intended for intermediate and advanced Latin speakers.
Textbook: Instructor will provide materials. 
Schedule: Tuesday and Wednesday at 6:00pm EDT
Instructor: Andrew Morehouse 
Sections capped at: 5 students. 

Beginning-Intermediate Conversational Greek: Classical and Biblical Proverbs - FULL

Course Description: This class will help those new or relatively new to speaking Ancient Greek acquire more fluency in speaking and reading comprehension. Participants will discuss several pagan and Biblical proverbs in each session with a view to paraphrasing with synonyms and equivalent constructions, as well as using the vocabulary and idioms of each assignment as a springboard for personalized conversations about their lives. The amount of authentic text read each session may be small, but the benefits of hovering or "circling" around the limited vocabulary, idioms, and grammatical structures of a few similar proverbs will become clear as participants internalize what they encounter and use it for open-ended conversation. Participants will encounter at least one essential idiomatic expression and grammatical construction per session. The class aims to be a joyous and low stress experience that builds confidence and will be tailored a great deal to the needs and desires of the particular participants.

Level: This course is intended for students with intermediate to advanced knowledge of Ancient Greek but perhaps only limited experience speaking Ancient Greek.
Textbook: Instructor will provide materials.
Schedule: Tuesdays and Thursdays at 2:00pm EDT (Section 1) and Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8:00pm EDT (Section 2).
Instructor: David Ring
Tuition: $200
Sections capped at: 5 students. Both sections are now full.

 

Intermediate-Advanced Conversational Greek: Septuagint: The Book of Ruth

Course Description: "[these] brief chapters outline the two principal archetypes of Western narrative, the Abrahamic myth of definitive rupture and the Odysseian myth of ultimate return, the journey home." (Herbert Marks) Among the "greatest hits" of the Bible, The Book of Ruth is sui generis. In it we find a peaceful, harmonious world of neighborly "small town" values, where landowner and field worker respect each other, where strong women of character take center stage, where the valor of the heroines and heroes requires no swords, where there are no villains, and where inclusivity triumphs over ancestral animosities. This charming and beloved text investigates the nature of love, family, friendship, loyalty, trust, community, redemption, and inclusion. It raises provocative questions: What is home? How can one "go back (home)" to a place one has never been? Is this book a subversive dissent concerning the status of the Moabites? Does it turn the martial ideal of a "mighty (man) of worth" on its head? But why is the last word of the text "David"? This enchanting literary masterpiece raises these and many other questions in fewer than 100 lines/4 chapters. In this class participants will read closely and discuss the Septuagint translation, as well as read for context (in whatever language) several crucial passages from the Torah, Ezra and Nehemiah, the beginning of 1 Samuel, etc. The instructor will provide minimal notes on names, translation issues, etc., as well as several reading and discussion questions for each assigned reading. Despite very short weekly readings, thoughtful preparation will be essential in order to have rich and efficient seminar discussions. Participants must agree to adhere to the instructor's ground rules concerning the nature of a Great Books seminar, in particular with regard to the use of secondary sources. For example, in one later session the homework will be to re-read the book carefully and write a proposed outline of the artistic structure of the whole. The intent of that assignment is that participants grapple with the text and think for themselves rather than look at any pre-existing compositional outline from secondary literature.

Level: This course is intended for students with intermediate to advanced knowledge of Greek and at least intermediate proficiency in speaking Ancient Greek.
Textbook: Instructor will provide materials (and audio recordings, if requested).
Schedule: Fridays at 2:00pm EDT 
Instructor: David Ring
Tuition: $100 (five meetings total)
Sections capped at: 5 students.

Intermediate-Advanced Conversational Greek: Lucian's Funniest Dialogues

Course Description: The love-life of redneck, independent country singer, Polyphemus; philosophers, dictators, and gold-diggers in the underworld; a dinner seating chart showdown between Mr. Toxic Masculinity Himself, Hercules, and Asclepius, the alternative medicine provider; the kleptomaniacal Baby Hermes; the version of the Judgment of Paris you definitely can't act out with high school students; the xenophobic god, Momus, trying to "Make Olympus Great Again": the funniest of Lucian's satirical dialogues are quite funny.  They are also teeming with fantastic idioms for speaking Ancient Greek.  When the instructor of this course read over 100 dialogues from Lucian's collections (Dialogues of the Gods, Dialogues of the Sea Gods, Dialogues of the Dead, and Dialogues of the Courtesans) and several longer stand-alone dialogues, these are the ones he marked as funniest.  This, of course, is not exactly objective but participants are likely to be quite pleased with these selections.  Participants will not only read, paraphrase, and savor the text together, but also use the vocabulary and idioms in it to have personalized conversation about their lives, passions, likes, dislikes, opinions, etc. 

Level: This course is intended for students with intermediate to advanced knowledge of Greek and at least intermediate proficiency in speaking Ancient Greek.
Textbook:  We will use the Nimis and Hayes editions, which have copious notes in English.  They are all available as free pdfs.  The instructor will provide the specific, shorter dialogues from these pdfs (since they come from several collections), as well as Rouse's edition with notes written in Ancient Greek. 
Schedule:  Tuesdays and Thursdays at 1:00pm EST.
InstructorDavid Ring
Tuition: $200 (ten meetings total)
Sections capped at: 5 students.

INTENSIVE COURSES

These intensive Latin and Hebrew courses are offered for complete beginners.  They cover half the material our usual intensive courses do Telepaideia intensive courses use both traditional presentation of grammar in English and spoken teaching techniques. The May courses are a continuation of our April courses. New intensives will be offered ab initio in June. 

Intensive Latin - part two (five week)

Course Description: This course is a continuation of part one from the April term. This course is an intensive introduction to the Latin language. It covers half of the material that our usual semester course covers. (for section 2: chapters 21-40 of Wheelock's.)
Textbook: Section 1: Lingua Latina per se Illustrata, Pars I: Familia Romana. Instructor will provide grammatical supplements. Section 2: Wheelock's Latin (be sure to purchase the 7th edition) and Thirty-Eight Latin Stories. Recommended:1) Wheelock Workbook, 2) Lingua Latina per se Illustrata, Pars I: Familia Romana.
Schedule: Section 1: Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 2pm EDT. Section 2: Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 3pm EDT. 
Instructor: Section 1: Michael Sweet; Section 2:Marcello Lippiello
Tuition: $500
Sections capped at: 5 students. 

 

Intensive Biblical Hebrew - part two (five week) - FULL

Course Description: This course is an intensive introduction to Biblical Hebrew. Level: This course is intended for beginners. It will begin where the Intensive Hebrew 1 (Five Week) course ended.
Textbook: Weingreen, Joseph, A Practical Grammar for Classical Hebrew, 2nd Edition (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1959). ISBN 0-19-815422-4
Schedule: Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 9pm EDT.
Instructor: W. David Nelson
Tuition: $500 
Sections capped at: 5 students. This course is now full.

MODERN LANGUAGE COURSES FOR CLASSICISTS

These language courses, taught by French, German, Italian, and Greek classicists, allow participants to read and discuss great works of French, German, Italian, and Modern Greek in the target language.

Literature as Contagion: An Introduction to the Decameron - FULL

Course Description: A crash course in Boccaccio’s Decameron. We will begin by reading the Author’s “Proemio” and “Introduction” to the first day of storytelling: containing, respectively, a recollection of past lovesickness, and the most famous account of the 1348 plague in Florence. From there, we will sample a selection of tales and frame-moments from across the Decameron, observing how the logic of the pathogen continues to work as a literary device once the plague is (seemingly) pushed into the margins of storytelling. We will conclude, appropriately, with the Author’s “Conclusion” as a final meditation on paradigms of infection and “salute” (health; salvation), here reconfigured as relationships between readers and authors.
Level: Ability to read the Italian is ideal, but not required. Sessions will be conducted in English, though I hope to engage with Boccaccio’s text in the original Italian as much as possible.
Textbook: Instructor will provide materials.
Schedule: Thursdays at 6:00pm EDT
InstructorKristen Hook
Tuition: $100 (five meetings total)
Sections capped at: 5 students. This course is now full.

 

MODERN GREEK FOR CLASSICISTS

Course Description: A course designed for students who know Ancient Greek and would like to learn the modern Greek language.
Level: This course is intended for beginners with knowledge of Ancient Greek.
Textbook: Instructor will provide materials and a book (Modern Greek for Classicists) will also be available for gated access online.
ScheduleMondays & Wednesdays at 12.00 EDT
InstructorIlias Kolokouris
Tuition: $200 (ten meetings total)
Sections capped at: 5 students

 

MODERN GREEK READING COURSE: MODERN GREEK AESTHETICISM: GOD IN EXILE, HOMEWARD BOUND

Course Description: This course focuses on the late 19th century Greek Aesthetes. Like their British contemporaries (such as Oscar Wilde, who we will also read in translation), the Aesthetes of Athens tried to reformulate the idea of classicism into a radical ideal. The prose of Episkopopoulos, Rodokanakis, and, above all, Giannopoulos transformed the study of Classical Greece into a productive mode of art. 
Level: This course is intended for those with some experience in Classical and Modern Greek, though English translations will be provided.
Textbook: Instructor will provide materials.
Schedule: Thursdays 10am EDT
InstructorIlias Kolokouris
Tuition: $100 (five meetings total)
Sections capped at: 5 students

 

MODERN GREEK READING COURSE: WOMEN OF HOMER BY OSCAR WILDE

Course DescriptionA classicist well influenced by Plato and Aristotle’s Ethics on his major work The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde studied classics at Magdalen College, Oxford. As an undergraduate there, he decided to write a long essay surveying the chapter “Women of Homer” from John Addington Symonds’s Studies of the Greek Poets. But young Wilde’s project became bigger than he expected. It was August 1876, an inspiring vacation in Ireland, and he ended up writing an unfinished idiosyncratic introduction to the major of Homer’s heroines. First published by the Oscar Wilde Society and edited by Thomas Wright and Donald Mead, Women of Homer is Oscar Wilde’s earliest surviving prose work, his first attempt at reviewing, with all the later elements of Aesthetic Philosophy that define him in his work The critic as artist. Together we will read a modern greek translation of the text, along with the original.
Level: This is a course of advanced Modern Greek translation.  
Textbook: Instructor will provide materials.
ScheduleSundays at 1pm EDT
InstructorIlias Kolokouris
Tuition: $100 (five meetings total)
Sections capped at: 5 students 

 

FOR TEACHERS

 

Teaching Latin to Beginners Online Using LLPSI

Course Description:Join us to read and discuss teaching the opening chapters of Familia Romana Book 1 of Ørberg's Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata. We will employ such techniques as paraphrase and summary as we read together, with a view to explaining text and grammar to beginning level students. Students should have a copy of the text, either the ebook or any edition of the paper book.
Schedule: Mondays at 6:00pm EDT
Textbook: Materials will be provided by the teacher and freely available online
InstructorLaura Manning
Tuition: $100 (five meetings total)
Sections capped at: 5 students. 

 

Selections from Ovid's Metamorphoses for Teachers - FULL

Join us to read and discuss selections from the Metamorphoses in Latin, as Latin. No translation. We will employ such techniques as paraphrase and summary as we read Ovid's retelling of stories from mythology. Feel free to use any copy of the text.
Schedule: Mondays at 4:00pm EDT
Textbook: Materials will be provided by the teacher and freely available online
InstructorLaura Manning
Tuition: $100 (five meetings total)
Sections capped at: 5 students. This course is now full.

 

Beginning Conversational Latin for Teachers: Online Edition

Would you like to use more spoken Latin in your teaching, but have not yet felt ready? This course provides you the opportunity to start speaking the language you have been reading and teaching, before you try it out with your students. The course addresses such topics as greetings and leave-takings, speaking about the classroom, speaking about the computer, speaking about the school, the weather, working with textbooks and text, giving and understanding directions. All lessons are suited to teaching in an online environment.
Textbook: Materials will be provided by the teacher 
Schedule: Tuesdays at 4:00pm EDT
InstructorLaura Manning
Tuition: $100 (five meetings total)
Sections capped at: 5 students. 

 

SPECIAL OFFERINGS

 

Greek: Songs for Ancient Greek Learners and Lovers

Course Description: Eager to spice up your Ancient Greek coursework? In these workshops, participants will explore, read, and sing songs written in–or at least translated into–Ancient Greek. From Seikilos to Abba, songs are a fantastic way to connect, relax, and enjoy the fruits of one’s study. Materials will be provided by the instructor, but participants are encouraged to share their mnemonics and favorite hits. The goal is to disseminate the hard work of our predecessors and contemporaries, and to support a community of shared artifacts.
Level: Intermediate or advanced knowledge of Greek.
Textbook: Materials will be provided by the instructor.
Schedule: Tuesdays at 6:00pm EDT
Instructor: R.J. Parsons-McCrackin
Tuition: $100 (five meetings total)
Sections capped at: 5 students

 

Latin: Scansion Bootcamp

Course Description: In this group, participants will explore the rhythms of Latin poetry across the millennia, while decoding riddles, playing word games, and mastering the art of scansion painlessly. No prior experience in Latin poetry is assumed. This course is ideal for intermediate and advanced Latin students with limited exposure to classical poetry, and for Latin instructors who are looking to add new tools and activities to their pedagogical toolkits.
Level: Intermediate or advanced knowledge of Latin
Textbook: Materials will be provided by the instructor.
Schedule: Thursdays at 6:00pm EDT
Instructor: R.J. Parsons-McCrackin
Tuition: $100 (five meetings total)
Sections capped at: 5 students

Papyrology

Course Description: This course is a broad introduction to Papyrology. Ancient texts on papyrus have survived in astonishing quantities mostly from ancient Egypt. The study of papyri ranging in date from the conquest of Egypt by Alexander the Great (332 BC) to the Arab occupation (middle of the VII century AD) offers an extraordinary glimpse into many aspects of daily life, history and literary culture of Greco-Roman and Byzantine Egypt that are otherwise unknown. Papyrology is an essential discipline for students and scholars of the Ancient World – classicists, historians, specialists in ancient literature, linguistic, material culture etc. This course aims to introduce participants to the study of papyri especially in Greek, documentary as well as literary. The students will acquire the main lines of the history of the discipline; they will learn how to read papyri, the methods and tools to understand their meaning, as well as the massive – but sometimes not recognized enough – contribution of papyrology to other disciplines. Through a selection of relevant exemplars, they will be provided with the skills to contextualize and analyze papyri as both texts and artifacts, and will appreciate the role of papyri as privileged sources for the history of Egypt from the age of the Ptolemies to late antiquity.
Level: This course is intended for students with intermediate to advanced knowledge of Ancient Greek, as well as for experts in Classics and related fields.
Textbook: Instructor will provide materials. Recommended: 1) P. Parsons, The City of the Sharp-Nosed Fish. 2) The Lives of the Greek in Roman Egypt, Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2007. 3) E.G. Turner, Greek Papyri. An Introduction, Oxford at the Clarendon Press, 1968 (or more recent editions).
ScheduleMonday and Thursday 9:00am EDT
Instructor: Isabella Bonati
Tuition: $200
Sections capped at: 5 students

Enroll

To register for a Telepaideia course, please fill out this enrollment form and pay by credit card. There are no refunds for Telepaideia courses, but tuition credit can be applied to a future semester. If you have any questions, please email info@paideia-institute.org.

 

 

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